Urgency for leadership to spark collective action and transformational change

Urgency for leadership to spark collective action and transformational change

By KERRY WORTHINGTON

As 2017 wraps up, it is becoming clear that leaders need support and an audience. As Janine Finnell, Executive Director, Leaders in Energy, pointed out – change leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Susan B. Anthony did not achieve their visions alone. They always have a supportive team to light the spark of action. The Leaders in Energy community is a global support team to encourage collective action and sincere change.

What started off as a Linked-In group several years ago is now a multigenerational leadership and global action network. In 2017, LERCPA earned its 501(c)(3) status, conducted or participated in 14 events and workshops and expanded the number of its sponsors and benefactors. Much more is planned for 2018.

This 4th annual 2017 Four Generations of Clean Energy and Sustainable Solutions Awards and Holiday Event recognized leaders in each of the four generations in the workplace, e.g., Millennial, Gen X, Baby Boomer, and World War II/Traditionalist.  The event was sponsored by ArlingtonGreen, Longenecker & Associates, and Waterford, Inc. The event benefactors donated door prizes (revealed at the end). This was also Leaders in Energy 50th event!

Microgrids: Distributed Energy and Resilience

Microgrids: Distributed Energy and Resilience

Over a month after Category 5 Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico causing catastrophic damage, much of the island is still without power. The storm knocked out power to almost all of the commonwealth. Homes, schools, hospitals, and other critical services and infrastructure were left without power. Even now, only a fifth of residents have power.

Microgrids may provide the means to reduce vulnerability—and improve resilience—in the wake of a changing climate and increasing risk of natural disasters.

The Urgency of Now and Building a Global Action Network for Change

Do you feel that you matter and that you can make a difference to make this world a better place through positive action? Increasingly, people are feeling bombarded by so much bad news that they can start totally tuning out or becoming paralyzed by inaction because they are totally overloaded or disillusioned. It’s like what can one person do?

Microgrids reach a tipping point

Microgrids reach a tipping point

Federal and local government and industry professionals discussed microgrid technologies and trends at a forum on October 19, 2017 at the Edison Electric Institute (EEI). The event was cohosted by Leaders in Energy and Resilient Virginia and sponsored by EEI, eSai LLC, and Microgrid Knowledge.

The utilization of microgrids plus battery storage is increasingly seen as the wave of the future to help ensure energy reliability and security in an age of intense weather events and cybersecurity threats.

Clean energy professionals exchange career tips

Clean energy professionals exchange career tips

Leaders in Energy conducted its 4th annual Green Jobs Forum and Green Career Workshop on August 17, 2017. The sold-out event, with over 100 people participating, was held at the DC Sustainable Energy Utility (DCSEU) headquarters in Washington, DC.

Cybersecurity and the power grid

Cybersecurity and the power grid

In the face of the mounting threats of cyberattacks and the vulnerable, interdependent electric grid systems, governments, utilities, businesses, and people need to come together and do what is necessary to be prepared. No one can afford to be complacent. This was the message at the Energy Infrastructure and Cybersecurity forum held by Leaders in Energy at Make Offices in Arlington, VA (Clarendon) on June 1, 2017.

Opinion: The frog, climate change, and Trump

Opinion: The frog, climate change, and Trump

There is a short analogy that has been used to explain the human response to climate change (whether in the form of denial, inaction, or delay, or simply nonchalance): that if you throw a frog into a pot of boiling water, he will hop right out, but if you put the frog in a pot of cold water and then turn on the burner, he will remain calmly in the pot until he is fully cooked.

The analogy does provide some insight into our lackadaisical response to a changing climate. From a human perspective, climate change is indeed a slow-moving phenomenon, but geologically-speaking, it is incredibly rapid. As a set of events and changes unleashed primarily by our discovery of fossil fuels some 300 years ago (and dramatically increased rates of extraction and combustion mostly in the last hundred), a cognitive sense of changing climate is distributed across only a dozen generations – either too slow to notice, or too ambiguous to come to conclusions about causality.

Are you prepared if the lights go out in your area?

Are you prepared if the lights go out in your area?

I just finished reading the cyber-techno book thriller, Blackout, by Marc Elsberg, on the theme of a cyberattack in Europe and the United States leading to a prolonged power outage. It made me wonder whether I was really prepared for an emergency of this kind. It was bad enough experiencing the Derecho storm in the summer of 2012 where my neighborhood in Virginia experienced a power outage in the sweltering heat for 5 days!

After that experience, I became more interested in the topic of community microgrids and back-up power systems to help shield one in the event of a power outage. As a result of reading Marc’s book, I have also been doing research on the best ways to prepare for a power emergency, whether caused by natural or more nefarious reasons such a cyberattack.